Ashley Madison.com a Complete Scam? Get Ashley Madison Tips and Reviews

Ashley Madison a Scam?

Get Ashley Madison Tips and Reviews from people who have actually used the site!

Dating Help 101.com has recieved numerous complaints about the Ashley Madison Agency, claiming the site is nothing more than an elaborate scam to take your money and leave you scratching your head.

Like the article written about the allegded SexSearch.com scam, it appears that the Ashley Madison Agency is also using Date Bait to lure in paying clients.  The stories are usually all the same:

1.  You sign up for a ”free” account on Ashley Madison Agency

2. Your profile, no matter how incomplete, recieves e-mails from interested girls in your area.

3. Problem is, these messages are collect messages.   Like making a collect call on the phone, a collect message is sent to you free by the writter, but to view these messages, you the reader must pay.

4. You pay to read the message, or upgrade to a full membership to read all messages.  You reply to the message from the interested woman, and Never hear back.

5. You have paid good money to reply to what seems like an automated date bait message.

 More over, other subscribers have noticed a severe lack of other “paying members” on the site.  Almost all of the female profiles are “free trials”, and very few real paying members. 

But the site may not be all doom and gloom.  A possible explanation for the common experience on the site may be no different than trying to pick up the only girl in a bar full of guys.  A website like Ashley Madison or Sexsearch has a ratio of 90% males to 10% women.  As you walk in, your profile is fresh and new, and you might get looked at as you walk in the door.  But once you try a cheeseball pickup line (like every other guy has done), she is no longer interested.

One woman told Dating Help 101.com that her in box had hundreds on e-mails from guys looking for a quick hookup.  99% of them didn’t know how to talk to her in an e-mail and just demand what they wanted.  She never replied to them, and continued looking through the 100′s of other emails.  She wouldn’t hook up with a guy for a one night stand, instead she was bored in life and wanted to meet someone, with the possibility of sex later on.   If you want to suceed on a site like Ashley Madison, write your e-mails to appeal to this side of her… not a one night stand.

We suggest Adult FriendFinder 

To read more Dating Tips and Scams, Click Here!

There are currently 19 responses to “Ashley Madison.com a Complete Scam? Get Ashley Madison Tips and Reviews”

Why not let us know what you think by adding your own comment! Your opinion is as valid as anyone elses, so come on... let us know what you think.

  1. 1 On February 21st, 2010, skynwt446 said:

    It is most definitely a scam… employees pose as members. They track your activity and purposely “bait” you when they think you are ready to spend $$. DON’T WASTE YOUR TIME AND MONEY ON AM – IT IS A RIPOFF.

  2. 2 On July 8th, 2010, Eliahu A. Sinaiko, PhD. said:

    I heard about Ashley Madison on some TV news program concerned about married men and women having affairs. Sounded too good to be true. So after a bit of checking on their site, I bought a credit package and sent out a couple IMs.

    Almost immediately I received a collect message from “NibblyNeck” living in Pennsylvania. “So how long have you been here? Met any interesting people?” I sent her a reply which I had to split into two messages even though it was under the maximum size limit. I received no reply back which was odd since I am a very good and romantic writer.

    A few days later I received another collect message from “Chemistry_1? living in Canada. This message also said “So how long have you been here? Met any interesting people?”

    Now tell me, what are the odds of two women, living more than a 1000 miles apart, sending exactly the same message. They were of course fake, probably computer generated by AM in order to solicit charges to my account. For these two fake messages that they sent, their charges totaled about $50!

    Complaints to AM produced evasive answers, none of which addressed the fakery that I accused them of. Now they have sent me a customer support phone number. I’ll call, but I don’t expect much from them. I disputed the charge on my credit card and will probably get the money back. I’ll let you know what happens.

    By the way, read their Terms and Conditions. This paragraph is very revealing, but you probably would never see it buried in all the fine print:

    “E. Market Research

    From time to time the Service may include, offer, initiate or send winks, virtual gifts, collect messages instant chat and/or replies from individuals or programs (”Market Research”) for market research and/or customer experience and/or quality control and/or compliance purposes. Market Research information is used to provide analysis, feedback, trends, patterns, social commentary and information in the aggregate and aides in the process of monitoring our system for compliance with our operating standards. Market Research will NOT be conspicuously identified. We do not guarantee the authenticity of any member using our site. Any interaction or communication with Market Research is independent of, and separate from, our general database of Member’s seeking personal or physical or other kinds of encounters or introductions. You accept and acknowledge that any written statements, mail messages or instant messages made by Market Research are provided for “entertainment” purposes that serve to enhance the user’s personal online experience.”

    It seems that they are trying to protect themselves from lawsuits regarding their fraud!

  3. 3 On September 28th, 2010, H. Travers said:

    Oh wow! I never knew that! Totally a scam! If they are sending you emails and winks under the label “market research” then it goes to show that they know exactly what kind of a scam site they are running. But i quess the fact that they disclosed this in the Terms means you can’t sue them after you spend tons of money replying to a “market research” email!!

  4. 4 On October 1st, 2010, EverReadyEddie said:

    After seeing one of the much hyped Ashley Madison ads on TV and an interview with their CEO, Noel Biderman, I signed up out of curiosity. Like so many other guys I’ve since read about, I was pleasantly surprised to be immediately contacted by a likely sounding local lady and enticed into buying one of their exorbitant credit packages in order to speak to her. After she’d ensured I’d all but used up my credits in conversation with her, she went silent.

    I now know that she was probably a fake, sat in their offices in Canada thousands of miles away from me, employed by AM to reel in suckers like me. They even as much as admit to the practice in miniscule print in their Terms & Conditions where these ladies are described as ‘online hosts’ who are engaged in ‘marketing activity’. They also automatically re-bill you unless you go through a deliberately difficult and convoluted process to extricate yourself from their clutches.

    So my question is, what’s the difference between Ashley Madison’s nefarious ‘marketing activity’ and a Nigerian scamming operation? The answer – not a lot! As in the African scams, the sole purpose of these online hosts is to persuade men to spend their money by pretending to be something and someone they’re not.

    Of course Ashley Madison calculate that no-one will run squealing to the authorities or law courts because of the illicit nature of the site’s activity. Some might say ‘it serves you right’. Certainly I should have been alerted by the fact that the majority of ‘women’ on the site have publicly viewable photos. It is now obvious to me that any real ladies on an affairs/adultery dating site would not post a picture of themselves for all to view

    The Ashley Madison operation is little more than a slick and convincing scam and swindle to part men with their money. The chances of actually meeting a real woman with whom you might actually conduct an affair are about as remote as the hair growing back on their CEO’s balding head!

  5. 5 On October 1st, 2010, Roger said:

    Ashley Madison is a total scam. Their greed and lack of business scruples know no bounds. I’m amazed they’re allowed to continue trading given their marketing methods.

  6. 6 On October 4th, 2010, wavedoc said:

    Ashley Madison is a total scam, do not waste your money. Their customer service line puts you on permanent hold. The chat applet does not work. The “women” contacts are completely fake. They have an automated response generation software that sends winks and teaser email to suck you in to buy contact points. This site should be shut down. Luckily I was able to get refund thru my credit card after I proved their fraudulant activity.

  7. 7 On October 8th, 2010, Scott said:

    “E. Market Research

    From time to time the Service may include, offer, initiate or send winks, virtual gifts, collect messages instant chat and/or replies from individuals or programs (”Market Research”) for market research and/or customer experience and/or quality control and/or compliance purposes. Market Research information is used to provide analysis, feedback, trends, patterns, social commentary and information in the aggregate and aides in the process of monitoring our system for compliance with our operating standards. Market Research will NOT be conspicuously identified. We do not guarantee the authenticity of any member using our site. Any interaction or communication with Market Research is independent of, and separate from, our general database of Member’s seeking personal or physical or other kinds of encounters or introductions. You accept and acknowledge that any written statements, mail messages or instant messages made by Market Research are provided for “entertainment” purposes that serve to enhance the user’s personal online experience.”

    I say CLASS-ACTION LAWSUIT!

  8. 8 On February 24th, 2011, Sam said:

    Hey suckers! sorry for saying that, but i am a sucker too! to be brief, i’ll tell u my story with AM as brief as i can:

    I singed up for AM not expecting a lot few months ago, and yah i received winks and got access to private pictures for girls that weren’t really attractive. I actually did my homework and made my search using our true friend Google and read lots of threads saying that AM is not a scam and it’s the place to be for people like me (losers).

    I also received collect messages which confirm what the guys said above in this thread. Anyway, i started sending collect messages, didn’t want to pay obviously, and of course not a single reply.

    Few days ago, i read an article written by a lady about her inbox in AM and some tips about how does she “select” the messages to reply for from different guys sender (this is the link for the article: http://laffaire.info/articles/how-to-get-laid-on-ashley-madison ).

    After that i felt confidence quz im really good at attracting girls and know what say, so, i upgraded my membership and start using my charm lol. I updated my profile to look “attractive”, then sent a really impressive and well organized message that no lady can read it without replying to two ladies. Not surprisingly, i got a reply from one of them right away. Surprisingly, i never heard from the second lady, who are 39 years old!! Here the fishy thing: the lady who replied told me to tell her more about my self. So, i just got to write a more impressive message and sent it to her and u guessed it…. i never heard back from her although she is online almost all the time (she is online now as i am writing lol).

    Then, instead of waiting, I decided to wing as many girls as i can and will initiate a contact with whoever response… u guessed it again… not a single response!

    Now, i just want to finish my credit up expecting nothing from AM and contacted them to ensure that they won’t renew my membership, hopefully they wont. I really wish that i found this thread and read it before paying them the $49.

    My advice, if u wanna have an adventure, just go to the farest night club and try to hook up with someone, at least u would know what u r getting for the $120 motel room charge ;)

    i’ll update u if i manage to something out of AM scam guarantee website.

  9. 9 On March 14th, 2011, Able1 said:

    The site is complete BS….the profiles are fake, the people are fake, the business revolves around making use up their credits. That’s it. I’d venture to say about 10% of the people on the site (i.e. the women) are real, genuine, or exist.

    Don’t waste your money…better to pay for a prostitute….otherwise you’ll spend 10 times as much winking/sending stupid messages to cyberspace women who don’t even exist.

  10. 10 On March 21st, 2011, John Galt said:

    What’s a scam are these posts – are you all working for AFF which actually does what you say? I’ve been on AM for 3 years and it is the ONLY one that isn’t a scam. I am a male and I do not get any fake winks, or emails. There are some bogus “young” ladies on there, but they are not many and easy to detect (and they usually post as single). They try and lure you to a pay site for chat/webcam type activities, nothing to do with AM. But the vast majority (over 90%) of the postings are legit, and AM does provide a means for reporting the fraudulent ones. Whenever I am interested in what’s new on AM, I will login for a few weeks, initiate contacts, and get enough responses from real attractive women, that I will have at least 2-3 lunch dates that can lead to wherever you want it to. Yes, the women to men ratio is large, it’s in our genes to cheat. Get over it and get to the gym, work on your profile, and be INTERESTING and not a douche bag.

  11. 11 On May 12th, 2011, John Doe, Jr. said:

    Here’s my recent experience with Ashley Madison.

    I’m currently a paying “customer”. I initially received requests for collect messages. I declined those requests – and you can set your preferences to not accept collect messages.

    I’ve yet to have a female send me a non-collect message, probably because of the women to men ratio. Also, I obviously haven’t come up with a unique style or way to be “INTERESTING”, as ‘John Galt’ (above) says, thus to stand out.

    However, I do believe a large portion of those women are fake. Why? Because I’ve had a dozen or so “three-four email/message exchanges”. Of those, after getting to the point of actually setting up an initial, public, in-person meeting, all of them suddenly disappeared – I’d get a “This profile has not been found. Please try again.” message when going back to view their profile again.

    I’ve NEVER, and never will, provide a picture for this very reason. Your desired discreet “relationship” will be greatly jeopardized once that picture(s) “gets out” on the internet. What happens to those pictures when those women evaporate into cyber space?

    That leads to the next question, if all these “attached females” want a secret/discreet relationship, why would they post their pictures, assuming the pictures they post are actually theirs? I’m guessing most of the pictures are fake too.

    I obviously didn’t do my research before paying … you might want to do more research before putting down your hard earned money.

    In the mean time, I’ve got credits to use up. Who knows, I MIGHT get lucky but for sure won’t be buying anymore.

    I have contacted Ashley Madison Customer Service asking about all this but have yet to hear back from them. Will post again here with what they have to say, if and when I do hear from them.

  12. 12 On June 11th, 2011, Greg said:

    AM is a scam. Here are the scams I ran into, PLEASE READ the LAST scam. 1.As others wrote, I received many “winks’ from women I ‘winked’, usually 2 – 3 weeks later. I would then spend money to email them and never hear anything back. 2.You ‘buy’ so many minutes to the AM chat facility, for some reason mine always ran down to 0, which means I didnt put it on pause. Maybe once that happened but not twice. 3.Sending and email, the default is ‘Priority mails’, which means you see if its opened. You have to uncheck it or else its 10 points, 10% of your initial points in the basic package. 4. now here is the proof of outright scam. I got tired of all the ways AM was scamming me, I deleted my account and they charged $19.99 to my credit card to delete me account. GET IT, THEY CHARGED A CUSTOMER WHO WANTED TO QUIT VISITING THEIR SITE. YOUR MONEY IS MUCH BETTER SPENT ON OTHER SITES AND YOU DON’T FEEL LIKE YOU ARE GETTING SCREWED. This all happened, MAY – JUNE OF 2011.

  13. 13 On July 13th, 2011, John Doe, Jr. said:

    As a follow up to my May 12 comment …

    I’m not saying Ashley Madison “works” or does not work, however, based on my experience, I’ve come to the conclusion that a guy has a better chance of winning the lottery than having any “success” on Ashley Madison. The real final kicker is, they actually charge you twenty bucks, that’s $20.00, to completely delete your profile and anything associated with it … something that SHOULD BE free!

    DO NOT BE A SUCKER LIKE ME! You have better places to spend your hard earned money than on a website like Ashley Madison.

  14. 14 On August 27th, 2011, Jrv said:

    Probably a unique situation, but God Damn you guys are idiots when it comes to women!
    We have a fun little hobby of fucking other guys and most of you think your dick makes a difference.

    It’s really not that important about your dick size. REALLY!
    Susan

  15. 15 On October 22nd, 2011, James said:

    I am a single guy with enough cash to burn and intrigued by human behavior. They (Ashley Madison) robbed me some of this cash with their billing tricks system. Here is an example: After receiving fake emails from “hot women” for more than a year and realizing that I was being robbed, I decided to delete my profile. They charged me a $19.00 nonrefundable fee for doing so. These guys are brilliant criminals that should be in jail. Unfortunately, they will not be in jail because they have found the perfect scam. Here is why: they have real names and account information of politicians and they will leak these names to the press as soon as someone opens their mouth. As I said, they are brilliant criminals.
    If you have issues with them, call (1-866-742-2218) them and tell them that are criminals. Better yet, post your issues all over the internet.

  16. 16 On November 4th, 2011, Bob said:

    I had been signed up for five minutes when I received two collect messages from far cities. I spent $2.50 to see “want to chat?” Never heard another word. Don’t reply to these out-of-town messages.

    Also, when you are paying for anything, run your right side bar all the way to the top. They hide charges above the line so you can’t delete them. Read the whole page because all of the charges are preset to “pay.” Also watch out when sending messages, priority mail costs double and you will be charged unless you uncheck it.

    I still have credits to burn but after that I’m gone. Bob

  17. 17 On July 6th, 2012, Jack said:

    I have been on AshleyMadison for 3 months. I have met 4 people in real life, had sex with 2. I did not pay to communicate with 2 of them, and only paid 5 credits for the other two. Most women there are 30-50, so relax your damn standards and stop going after 20 year olds. They don’t need a site to cheat, they just need a beer.

    A lot of the scams on dating sites are easily avoidable. Keys for Ashleymadison and more:

    1. Make your username brand new and unique for your dating sites. Use that unique name as your email absolutely everywhere. Most popular is Yahoo, hotmail, google, etc. Have all those e-mails forward to one e-mail hub. Leave hints to your email in your profile, if you can get away with it.

    Use the same name at all dating sites. Join other things using that unique username and do your best to make it able to be found via search engines. This way, you can get away with making a free profile everywhere, and still get messages from people who aren’t idiots.

    2. Go through all of your settings, and look out for extra charges. You might want priority messages someday, but it is mostly worthless. Set your profile so that it’s not automatically set for priority.

    3. Never live chat through Ashley Madison. Get them your e-mail, and use Yahoo messenger to live chat. No reason to pay for this.

    4. Be aware of scammers. This is why you have a separate e-mail for this stuff. Don’t give away personal info if you don’t have to. Don’t fall for profiles that have too ‘beautiful’ or too much ‘production’. If it looks like the girl is a model, then don’t trust it. If people are sending you messages when they are offline, or within minutes of you signing up, then do not respond to them.

    5. Communicate mostly in winks [free] to get people to see your profile, and hopefully find your e-mail. Use the “you don’t have enough info” wink to increase chances of getting them to send you a message with real info in it.

    6. Do not accept collect messages. If you are going to spend the money… It takes 5 credits to accept it, and another 5 credits to open up communications after that. You might as well just send a message telling them your situation and that you don’t actually accept collect messages, that way communication is open for 5 credits instead of 10.

    7. Always google the username. If it’s a really unique username, chances are you can send an e-mail asking “are you the same ____ from AshleyMadison? I’m ____ on AshleyMadison”. Send the e-mail to the top 5 mail sights to see if it exists. If the e-mail doesn’t exist, you will get a reply ‘error’ within a few minutes.

  18. 18 On July 6th, 2012, Jack said:

    That should have said 1 month. I have been on AM for 1 month.

  19. 19 On July 17th, 2013, jim said:

    I signed up on Ashley Madison and Yep I got cheated. Signed up for free and then had to spend money to answer messages that asked if I was online. I stopped the auto pay in my account and they went ahead and charged my credit card again. so I filed complaint with my credit card company and I also filed a complaint with the Wash. State Attorney General’s office of Consumer Protection.

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